Category Archives: architecture

20 Incredible Inventions Of The 21st Century To Make Your Life Astonishing.

Innovation is about making ideas happen and necessity is the mother of invention.

Designers are the marvelous people who are devoted to think out of the box to make our life more comfortable.

Some of the most incredibly designed pieces of the past year are enlisted here:

The invisible computer keyboard

© getnoki

This is almost literally magic. The invisible Noki keyboard is made up of two simple-looking bracelets which monitor the movement of your fingers. Very impressive indeed, but a bit hard to use if you still can’t touch type!

The spherical bath tub

© aizzz

Invented by Russian designer Aleksandr Zhukovskii, take a bath in this spherical tub and it feels like you’re swimming in the air.

Text clocks

© qlocktwo

Unlike ordinary clocks with hands or numbers, which make you simply focus on how quickly time is passing, the text clock makes you stop and think about the moment you’re living through.

Signal indicator for cyclists

 
The Azerbaijani designer Elnur Babayev came up with this idea. His Cyclee projector allows a cyclist to indicate clearly to other drivers what he is about to do — even when it’s completely dark. The projector is attached to the seat, and works automatically without any input from the cyclist.

The portable ladder for climbing any tree

© canopystair

Many adults regret that they’re already too old to climb trees without risking an accident. Sometimes you just still want to! But with the CanopyStair, you can easily get to the top of a tree without having to worry about how you’ll make your way down. The staircase can be easily fixed to any tree without harming its bark.

Superheroes to hold up your books

© artoridesign

These really do create the impression that your books are being held up by superman. In fact, it’s really the work of magnets which are attracted to the metal base hidden in the book itself.

The device which shows tomorrow’s weather

© tempescope

Ken Kawamoto is a software engineer who has the ambition to unite the digital and real worlds. He came up with the idea of a device which visually displays tomorrow’s weather. He calls it the Tempescope. If there’s going to be a thunderstorm, it shows flashes of real lightning; water drops fall down if it’s going to rain. It’s truly amazing! The only problem is it can’t quite show us snow yet.

The tap which makes saving water beautiful

© Simin Qiu

Young London-based designer Simin Qiu has created a unique design for a bathroom tap which not only looks stylish, but helps save resources by turning the stream of water into an elegant, captivating ’net’ spiral. A special turbine saves 15% more water than with an ordinary tap.

A saddle for dad

© saddlebaby

SaddleBaby is a fantastic new way to transport those kids who love to sit on their father’s shoulders. Dad now has his hands free to use his phone or camera — so everyone’s happy!

Shoes which fit your feet perfectly

© vibram

Japanese designer Masaya Hashimoto came up with an idea for a new pair of sneakers which perfectly wrap around every curve of your feet. Inspired by Furoshiki, traditional Japanese wrapping cloth used for transporting goods, the shoes have no laces and instead wrap around the foot, fastening with velcro.

The Armstrong Light Trap

© Armstrong

This futuristic-looking lamp is both beautiful and mysterious. You can regulate how bright it is using a very simple method — everything depends on how many of the ’craters’ on its surface are left open. Named in honour of famous American astronaut Neil Armstrong, it was in fact invented by a team of Russian designers.

Shoes with removable heels

© tanyaheathcanada

Now with just a light tug on your shoe you can turn casual pumps into elegant high heels for the evening. Designer Tanya Heath has come up with special shoes that can be matched to a whole range of different heels. They’re indispensible for all those who want to wear nice shoes but have to drive!

Weapons for a pillow fight

The world would probably be a much quieter place if we settled all our disputes with pillow fights. Designer Bryan Ku has clearly had the same thought. For those who love pillow fights, he has invented a selection of special soft weapons.

A miniature garden around your neck

© wearableplanter

Designer Colin Jordan has invented some ideal jewelry options for those who love nature. He makes tiny little vases using a 3-D printer, and fills them with small flowers who actually grow like their larger cousins. They can be worn as necklaces and broaches or placed on your work desk.

Mirror Cups

A Japanese design team called D-Bros has come up with a unique set of tea cups and saucers which they’ve given the brand name ’Waltz’. These cups reflect the colourful patterns on their saucers, making selecting ones that match no longer so difficult. Captivating!

The coffee cup which gives you a kiss

© behance

The kissing coffee cup was invented by Jang Woo Seok. ’I love both drinking coffee and kissing people,’ he says. ’Now I can do both at the same time.’

The lamp made from an old tree stump

 
Each one of these lamps is unique, simply because they’re made from real tree stumps. Light-emitting diodes have been placed inside their cracks.

Decorative rolling pins

© Vatek

A simple but brilliant idea, this rolling pin allows you to easily make cookies with decorative patterns on them. This was actually invented in response to an earlier version for children.

Rings that look like they’ve come alive

Every one of these rings, which have been invented by the artist who goes by the name of m e r r y m e, are made up of three separate parts. Individually they don’t look like much, but when worn together as a set it’s as if they’ve come alive on your fingers.

Cat seats

 

These special blocks were invented specially for cat owners. Our feline friends absolutely adore finding new ways to snuggle inside them.

Do you know any other invention to add further? Please leave your reply in comments.

Courtesy: NTD.TV

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Have you ever heard about the Toothpick City or Toothpick World? Here’s the wonderful creation.

Stan Munro, a big fan of architecture, though not a student has first build a Toothpick City and then a Toothpick World which is in the 2015 Guinness Book of World Records for the tallest toothpick structure: Burj Khalifa, Dubai (16ft.) entirely made out of toothpicks.

Burj Khalifa, Dubai entirely made out of toothpicks. (The tallest toothpick structure)

Stan learned everything through books, the internet, History Channel, and a little something called “8th-Grade Algebra.”

Toothpicking has been a hobby since his 5th grade art teacher brought a toothpick project to the classroom. Stan stayed with it, and almost 30 years later. Stan makes a living at it.

10 years ago, when his wife Suzi was suffering with some kidney liver disease and he had to stay home caring for her, he started toothpicking. In 2006, he sold his first Toothpick City exhibit to a museum in Spain. Suzi is getting better day by day and who is Stan’s inspiration, his muse, and the center of his world. They are located in Syracuse, NY.

He completed Toothpick City 1 (A History of Skyscrapers), which had 50 of the world’s tallest buildings, in 2005.

After its sale he decided to start work on Toothpick City 2 (Towers and Temples) which will have 40 buildings made out of four million toothpicks and 170 litres of glue.

It includes the Blue Mosque in Istanbul, the Eiffel Tower and Notre Dame in Paris, the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and the Parthenon in Athens.

So far Stan has created more than 100 unique masterpieces consisting famous structures from around the world which are entirely made out of toothpicks.

Toothpick World is a traveling exhibit – unlike anyone has seen before. It is a collection of more than 60 famous buildings from around the world–ALL built to the same 1:164 scale, and all out of toothpicks. It can be set up in any configuration, and in a number of different museum spaces. Toothpick World is a sensory experience of engineering, architecture, culture and just plain craziness. It ABSOLUTELY has to be seen to be believed.

In March, 2012, Stan formed Toothpick World, LLC, a traveling exhibit corporation. The purpose of the exhibit is to entertain, educate, and even enlighten, as museum-goers see what one man can do with a little imagination, a whole lot of time, and more than 3 million toothpicks.

 

Few of his creations are:

Toothpick city I at the Museum of Science and Technology
Fenway Park, Boston, Massachusetts
The Roman Coliseum
The U.S. Nimitz – CVN68 Aircraft carrier
La Sagrada Familia, Barcelona, Spain

 

Akshardham Temple, India
The Blue Mosque, Istanbul, Turkey
Eiffel Tower, Paris
International Space Station
Grand Mosque, Mecca, Saudi Arabia
Leaning Tower of Pisa, Italy
Petronas Towers, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Statue of Liberty, New York
St. Peter’s Basilica Square, The Vatican
The White House, Washington D.C.
Tower Bridge, London
Taj Mahal, India

Visit Toothpick City and World for more images in detail.

Have a view on other similar post on Taj Mahal from matchsticks.

 

 

Yayoi Kusama floats a landscape of 1,300 mirrored spheres at the glass house

Yayoi Kusama, a Japanese artist floats a landscape of 1,300 mirrored spheres at the glass house.

Incorporated into the 49-acre landscape surrounding the glass house, Yayoi Kusama has realized the landscape installation ‘Narcissus garden’. on view from now until november 30, 2016, the work sweeps across the lower meadow and forest, creating a dramatic vista to the west of Philip Johnson’s historic glazed dwelling.

First created fifty years ago as part of the venice art biennale, this iteration of ‘narcissus garden’ comprises 1,300 floating steel spheres, each which measure approximately 12 inches in diameter (30 cm). drifting in the newly restored pond, the spheres move as wind passes and follow the water’s natural currents, forming a dynamic and ever-changing sculpture. the orbs’ polished mirrored surfaces reflect views of the pond pavilion, wooded landscape, and sky that surrounds it.

yayoi kusama glass house narcissus garden

The installation is incorporated into the 49-acre landscape surrounding the glass house
All images © KUSAMA studio

yayoi kusama glass house narcissus garden
The work sweeps across the lower meadow and forest
yayoi kusama glass house narcissus garden
“Narcissus Garden” comprises 1300 floating steel spheres
yayoi kusama glass house narcissus garden
The mirrored orbs drift in the newly restored pond
yayoi kusama floats a landscape of 1,300 mirrored spheres at the glass house
The spheres move as wind passes and follow the water’s natural currents

 

 

yayoi kusama glass house narcissus garden
The installation is on view from now until November 30, 2016

 

These 3D Optical Illusion structures will mystify your brain to think it’s defying the law of gravity.

Kokichi Sugihara, a Japanese professor can prove your eyes false or he can just make you think that there’s some magnet or invisible wire rolling behind his amazing art which is deceiving your eyes to falsify the law of gravity, but actually it’s just an optical illusion.

The 3D structures are designed in a way that they have a different perception when viewed from a particular angle. It’s just a trick and an art to speculate your mind to give it a false perception.

Have a view yourself below:

Video credit: Tech Insider

“The Floating Piers” a giant art installation on Lake Iseo in Italy is letting people walk on water

“The Floating Piers” is a giant art installation by the artist Christo on Lake Iseo in Italy which is enabling people walk on water.

Have an aerial view of “The Floating Piers” here:

So far thousands of tourist have flocked over the installation. The walkway is 100,000 square meters of shimmering yellow fabric, made up of 220,000 high density polyethylene cubes and is about 3 miles long. The installation is open for the public at large till 3rd of July.

Visitors can experience this work of art by walking on it from Sulzano to Monte Isola and to the island of San Paolo, which is framed by The Floating Piers.

The Floating Piers is absolutely free and accessible 24 hours a day, weather permitting,” said Christo.

For  further details visit The Floating Piers

World’s first 3D printed building opens in Dubai

The world’s first functional 3D-printed office building, a single storey building spread across 2,690 square foot, opened in Dubai in mid of May, 2016.

Located near the Dubai International Financial Center, the building was completed at a cost of about $140,000 in just 17 days and officials say they saved more than 70% on labor costs.

Dubai officials say their goal is towards technological development. It’s already a man-made wonder you will know once you visit Dubai.

This arc-shaped office building used a 20-foot tall 3D printer and a special mixture of cement to be built. Whole of the office structure with furniture was printed in 17 days and assembled in just 2 days.

Dubai officials say, “The future is based on 3D printing, whether we are talking about printing buildings or printing cloths or printing equipments or printing food or even printing some human body parts.”

The project is part of Dubai’s long term strategy to ensure that 25% of the city will be 3D printed by 2030.

Air and Noise Pollution Resistant Urban Treehouse Protecting Residents

Designed by Luciano Pia, Located in Turin, Italy, the facade also features silhouetted metal trees that foster the look and feel of a magnificent tree house.

25 Verde brings plants up off the ground in an attempt to evade Turin’s homogeneous urban scene and integrate life into the facade of the residential building.

There are 150 trees scattered along the outside of the residential building, and they absorb nearly 200,000 liters of carbon dioxide an hour. So, the lush greenery is not only aesthetically pleasing, but its natural absorption helps to eliminate harmful pollutants (such as car exhaust) as well as disruptive outside noise. Its presence also benefits the inside of the building, too. The plants’ full leaves in the spring and summer months mean that they help to block out the harsh sun. When they’re leafless in the winter, however, they bring in much-needed light to warm up the building.

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“Kusukusu” The largest treehouse in Japan build around a 300 years old tree

Takashi Kobayashi is the mastermind creator behind Kusukusu, the largest treehouse built around a towering, 300-year-old camphor tree in Atami, Japan. Completed in March 2014, Kusukusu is the result of collaborative work between Kobayashi and Hiroshi Nakamura of NAP Architects for the Risonare Resort.

After 3D-scanning hundreds of points on the tree, the team created a steel trellis that threads throughout the branches, forming a support system that’s both architecturally sound and visually arresting. The most worderful thing is that the self-standing structure doesn’t touch the tree at all, leaving it unharmed and free to grow further.

Perfect Balance Between Nature and Architecture by Dionisio Gonzalez

The Surreal Housing Projects By Dionisio Gonzalez

“Trans-Acciones,” the latest collection of artist Dionisio Gonzales is a set of surreal architectural designs that are not only amazing but equally beautiful. His project’s workplaces, mobile observatories and occasional retreats are balanced excellently.

Gonzales is well known for his architectural visualizations for disaster-prone areas.One cannot take his eyes off from the powerful and vast panoramic sceneries of these imaginary buildings.

All structures are set on pillars of reinforced concrete to support a horizontal structural plane. The composition’s idea is to leave the space at ground level open so it doesn’t corrupt in any way the surrounding environment. It comprises in a way what could be the ultimate equilibrium between nature and architecture.

Pools of Recycled Motor Oil Reflect Spectacularly in Switzerland’s Bellelay Abbey

Pools of Recycled Motor Oil Reflect Spectacularly in Switzerland’s Bellelay Abbey

Inside Switzerland’s Bellelay Abbey, two intriguing pools of recycled motor oil create serene, unbroken reflections of soaring architecture. The chapel’s ornately decorated arches and vaulted ceilings are mirrored in vivid detail on the oil’s rich, glassy surface. Unlike reflections in water, the oil pool minimizes glare and lets viewers gaze deeply into the images.

The addition of the oil pools to the chapel is interesting because it contrasts light and dark in a striking juxtaposition. The oil’s shimmering black surface boldly complements the chapel’s pristine, white-washed walls. The pools were added to the church as part of an art installation by Swiss artist Romain Crelier in 2013. Along with creating a feeling of augmented spaciousness, the reflection pool offers another serene element that inspires introspection.

For more details visit: Pools of Recycled Motor Oil